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American Psychological Association promotes Psychological work for Obesity


Obesity is one of the nation's fastest-growing and most troubling health problems. Unless you act to address the emotions behind why you overeat, you could be facing long-term problems.’

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/obesity.aspx

This article highlights the importance of Psychological interventions for Obesity, stating that most Obese cases have underlying unresolved emotional issues which are fueling their unhealthy eating habits. . For example, feelings of sadness, anxiety, or stress often lead people to eat more than usual. Unless you act to address these emotions, however, these short-term coping strategies can lead to long-term problems.

Here is a list of things you can do to take action against obesity:

 

 

 

Here are some other things to consider in helping you or someone you know take action against obesity:

  • Think about what you eat and why. Track your eating habits by writing down everything you eat, including time of day and amount of food. Also record what was going through your mind at the time. Were you sad or upset with something? Or, had you just finished a stressful experience and felt the need for "comfort food?"
  • Cut down on portions while eating the same foods. Along with making dieting feel less depriving, you'll soon find that the smaller portions are just as satisfying. This will also give you a platform to safely curb your appetite even more.
  • Note that while treating obesity often helps decrease feelings of depression, weight loss is never successful if you remain burdened by stress and other negative feelings. You may have to work to resolve these issues first before beginning a weight-loss program.
  • Losing weight is always easier when you have the support of friends and family. Try to enlist the entire household in eating a healthier diet. Many hospitals and schools also sponsor support groups made up of people who offer each other valuable encouragement and support. Research shows that people who participate in such groups lose more weight than going it alone.
  • Use the "buddy system." Ask a friend or family member to be "on-call" for moral support when you're tempted to stray from your new lifestyle. Just be sure you're not competing with this person to lose weight.
  • Don't obsess over "bad days" when you can't help eating more. This is often a problem for women who tend to be overly hard on themselves for losing discipline. Look at what thoughts or feelings caused you to eat more on a particular day, and how you can deal with them in ways other than binge eating. A psychologist can help you formulate an action plan for managing these uncomfortable feelings.

 

The American Psychological Association gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Sara Weiss, Ph.D., and Nancy Molitor, Ph.D., in developing this fact sheet.

 

*read the whole article  http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/obesity.aspx

 

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